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Benjamin John Hall

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Birth, Life, Death and Resurrection by Benjamin John Hall

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Footwear designer Benjamin John Hall squeezed, sprayed and smashed his shoes to dye them during a live event at London College of Fashion.

Benjamin John Hall's Design by Destruction project involved patterning custom-designed shoes using black dye embedded into or applied onto a set of three pairs of boots.

Models were lead through plastic strips hung in a door frame and along a custom catwalk designed by London studio The Decorators, which was created to accommodate the activities planned for other events in the series.

The first pair of knee-high leather boots had white uppers and black legs, which pouches filled with ink positioned on both shins.

Hall squeezed these pouches so the ink spurted from them onto the white sections, spilling onto the catwalk and causing the audience the jump back slightly. The dye created splattered patterns across the front of the shoes.

Next out was a pair of thigh-high leather boots with black uppers and platform heels, and white legs.

Hall sprayed each leg with dye from a bottle with a special nozzle, revealing horizontal strips that absorbed more dye that the rest of the material.

Finally, he took a hammer to a pair of white leather ankle boots with porcelain beaks that had the dye encased within them.

A wedge was placed beneath the curved sections before Hall hit them with a hammer to crack them without breaking off the protruding sections. The dye sept out of the cracked porcelain to colour the tips of the shoes.

The models then stood around a semi-circular platform so attendees could examine the end result close up and to give the dye a chance to dry.

The live display was the first in a series of 13 events curated for the relaunch of London College of Fashion's Fashion Space Gallery, which took place at the venue just off Oxford Street.

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Bibliography :  Made To Wear by Janice West

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One of the interesting facts about jewellery as an art form is that it demands to express within the limits of dimension something that is tactile, functional, emotionally felt, intellectually understandable, and, if you like, even shocking.

 

 

The relationship of the body to its environment, whether that environment is on the small scale of jewellery or on the large scale of architecture, has been a recurring theme in the work of many artists in the latter part of the twentieth century.

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